Back to Life!

After a year of voluntary banishment (see previous post), my inner artist is now finally re-inhabiting my corporeal body! My goal was for this to happen by April 15, so: mission accomplished. Glad I did it, glad it’s over.

First fun project: figure out how to make lightweight, break-resistant goat horns from non-toxic materials, for a faux taxidermy wall sculpture. The photo shows some of my trial & error steps toward a solution:Steve Eichenberger artistNote the principal & interest bar graph…kind of a non sequiter you may think…but an online interest calculator seemed as quick a way as any to generate a logarithmic progression, which I then used to mark off the lengths of horn segments on left. That was fine for two dimensions, but how to get sweet compound curves in three dimensions? So I then messed around with stapling a paper model, thinking I might be able to make horns from three cutout pieces of sheet metal or similar, joined along their three common edges. But I wouldn’t be able to freeform / fine tune the curves if the sheet material were pre-cut…so combining the two ideas — segments + three shared edges  — led to my favorite idea so far: solid segments joined by three flexible edges (hand carved wood segments with wire struts). Whether or not I ever actually use this particular idea, the “getting there” is a perfect example of my favorite part of the process: conceptualization > exploration > experimentation > discovery!

My return to freedom won’t be like stepping through a door, but more like fording a wide stream; because I need to make more than 100 crows/ravens to replenish my exhausted inventory and for gallery orders, which will consume the majority of my energy for the next four to six weeks. But “after that”  …    (I’ve been promising myself “after that” for so long that it’s hard to believe I’ll ever arrive, but I’m clinging to the likelihood that I will…)

Hopefully I can find an hour or two for experimentation here and there even in the midst of crow-making.

Overall, I’m very aware how fortunate I am, and am living my life immersed in constant gratitude.

 

Where am I?

I miss me! About a year ago, Jackie and I decided to remodel our 1950’s ranch house. We got bids. They were outrageously astronomical! Several years’ worth of income! So I talked my artist self into going on sabbatical for a year so I could use my one and only corporeal body to do the remodeling myself, with the ‘carrot’ that after that, my artist self would then be free to make art for years to come — and in nicer digs.

My goal all along has been to give my body back to my artist self by tax day 2016. That deadline is approaching, and I’m optimistic I’ll make it.

(I’ve been keeping up on crow/raven orders for Etsy and for several galleries & shops, but other than that I haven’t been making *any* self-expressive, experimental work.)

I put my Etsy store on ‘vacation’ (hah! some vacation) a month or so ago to help maintain my sanity as I tackled remodeling our main bathroom. We gutted it to the studs & subfloor, removed old wiring. I cut a big hole in the exterior wall, open to the backyard, to get a one-piece fiberglass shower unit into the room…yes, it was as crazy as it sounds, but it worked…plus now we have a nice new much-bigger-than-was-there-before window where the hole was!  We did spit-baths for too long, but now the new shower is operational, I installed new floor last week, and had first flush of new toilet yesterday! Progress.

The bathroom is the last biggie on my list. Completed list items include: all new kitchen with lift-up cabinet doors, all new deck with cable railing & aluminum decking, new flooring throughout house, a dozen or so new electrical circuits, air conditioning (the house had none before), two new picture windows & new patio slider, all new plumbing clear to the street, all new roof/gutters, septic system repaired, plus many tangential projects.

When I do return to self expressive artmaking, I’m expecting it will be in sculpture, not painting. Probably mixed-media sculpture — combining what I’ve learned by working in several different media in past years/decades. I’m really looking forward to returning this ol’ body back to my artist self, and seeing what we’ll make.

New Wall Art

Faux Taxidermy, Rabbit, Hare, wall sculpture by Steve Eichenberger

SOLD via Etsy

Recent experimental new direction / playing with new (to me) materials / letting my hands just make / my inner boss demanded non-toxic (for longevity of the artist), break resistant (to reduce stress of shipping, reduce packaging materials needed for shipping, reduce cost of shipping), light weight (for ease of hanging on a regular ol’ nail), and fun to work with (to keep that capricious inner artist dude reasonably happy…high maintenance fellow, he is!).

I experimented with making boat shapes (precursors to ears) of several different materials/recipes/sculpting methods/armatures/glues and so on  until I arrived at a combination of materials and methods that resonated with me (and met my inner boss’s criteria). I didn’t know exactly what to do next, so I just “did something,” thinking it might serve as a support for something else, but I ended up liking the supposed “undersculpture” so much that I didn’t want to cover it up. So I didn’t. And I put it on Etsy, and it sold! (Thanks B.A. in Texas!) The customer says she loves it, and that it looks better in person than the photo. Even my hard-to-please inner boss had to agree that this experiment was/is a success.

I have a second wall rabbit more than half done, but the holidays are looming so I’m being a good little deferred gratificationer and making ravens, crows, and more ravens so I don’t run short of them…but if/when I get caught up sufficiently on them, I look forward to continuing my experiments with faux taxidermy sculptures.

Faux Taxidermy, Rabbit, Hare, wall sculpture by Steve Eichenberger

140506psykopaint copy

Above is the sketch that made me want to make a sculpture of it. I’m old enough to be amazed by the pageant of digital tech — it seemed like magic to draw this with just a fingertip on a touchscreen Chromebook! This was the first project where I did all digital (rather than pencil on paper) conceptualizing. Kind of sad in some ways, but liberating and fun in others.

Idyllic Summer Setting…

Large scale ceramic sculpture by Steve Eichenberger, in an Oregon native plant garden.

Large scale ceramic sculpture by Steve Eichenberger, in an Oregon native plant garden.

Jackie’s Holiday Show…with a little of Steve thrown in around the edges

Nov 30/Dec 1, and Dec 7/8, 10 to 4, at our tile studio in Tualatin, OR, map here.

If you want the fancy dancy official email invitation we sent out last night, ask me and I’ll forward it to you.

90% of the show will consist of ceramic sculpture and paintings by my favorite artist, Jackie Hurlbert (in fact I like her so well I’ve lived with her since 1993).

I’ll have a “seconds sale” of my cast crows/ravens (first quality sold only through galleries), and a ragtag lot of ceramic masks, maybe some portrait paintings, and hundreds of tile overruns, nice seconds, and glaze experiments for you to clink through.

Hope to see you there!

Steve Eichenberger crows ravens

Steve Eichenberger crows ravens

Steve Eichenberger crows/ravens

Steve Eichenberger crows/ravens

Jackie Hurlbert artist

Jackie Hurlbert artist

tiles laid out for studio sale

tiles laid out for studio sale

Baby Portrait

Steve Eichenberger portraitsEtsy Commission — SOLD

Artist grade archival acrylics on 9-1/2 x 16 hardwood panel

Here you can see the reference photo the proud dads sent me of their few-month-old daughter:

graceprocess

Bib overalls

 

Acrylic on 15 x 17 panel, for Etsy commission, bib overalls requested to be included, from customer reference below:

Anna 1

 

“Anna 1” acrylic on 12 x 16 panel, using as reference a photo I took last spring. Thanks Anna!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anniversary Gift

This was commissioned as an anniversary gift from a son to his folks. Based on a nostalgic, romantic snapshot (below) from the 1970’s. They loved it😉

 

Group Portrait of Twelve

Portrait of twelve relatives commissioned by a local couple, B&L. Acrylic on panel, 20 x 32 inches.

Reference provided was actually a “photoshopped” composite of three different photos taken at different times and places.

Thanks B&L!

The portrait will be framed and hung on the brick wall behind.

Nice Turnout for my Portrait Presentation to OSA

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Whew! Everything went swimmingly for my presentation yesterday. I appreciated the overflow crowd in OSA’s main hall. I gave a whirlwind overview of how to develop your inner artist, develop artistic skill, market your work, sell your work, and use positive energy generated from that cycle to spin the next cycle…circling back with renewed confidence and enthusiasm to further developing artistic skills. I did a demo (under the slant mirror on the stage so people could see) of laying out a limited palette of colors, mixing flesh tones, & mixing “black.” Then I did a quick painting demo of roughing-in, from photo reference I took a few months ago. I enjoyed the process more than I thought I might, and look forward to similar opportunities that might come along in the future.

June 14 Presentation — You’re Invited!!!

I’ll be giving a one hour Portrait Painting demo and slide presentation at the Oregon Society of Artists, 2185 SW Park Place, Portland, on June 14 at 11 a.m. Free parking. I think they’ll have a potluck afterward.

You don’t have to be an OSA member to attend. As far as I can remember, this will be the first time I’ve had to speak in front of a crowd since 1977! At that rate, my next presentation will be when I’m 93, so you’d better come to this one.

Here’s the blurb from the OSA newsletter: (link will only work for this month, otherwise check the archives)

Coral

SOLD via Etsy

Completed commission for a family who by sheer coincidence (since they found me on Etsy) live ten minutes away, so I hand delivered it and got to see the subject of my painting!

Commission from Texas

SOLD via Etsy

Completed commission, just shipped to Texas. Acrylic on 16 x 25 panel.

 

Source snapshots, from which I “photoshopped” the composition together:

Anniversary Portrait

SOLD via Etsy

I worked on this anniversary portrait at the show, getting it about 90% done by Sunday. It was fun to be able to ask passersby and other OSA members for critique and recommendations. It’s for an Etsy commission; I sent my customer a digital image of it for approval last week and he said, “You are a genius!  I love it!  It is amazing!  I am so grateful to you.  I will pay for it tonight.  No changes necessary.  Thank you!!!!!” Music to my ears…very encouraging. I hope his wife likes it as well as he does, or better. It’s acrylic on a 16 x 26 hardwood panel, from customer supplied old snapshot:

Show went very well!

All the hard work preparing for the show was worth it! I had a great time painting for five days in a row, it was like a painting retreat. I received lots of positive comments, and many people said they would contact me for future commissions. I’m in communication with two prospects from the show who I think will follow through with commissions. I also got invited back by the show manager to be a demo artist at the Fall Home & Garden Show, Oct. 4-7, 2012 at the Expo Center. I’d like to be positioned with the Oregon Society of Artists again.

My booth (above) at the Spring Home & Garden Show about a week ago. As a designated “demo artist” I painted much of the time between 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. except for breaks.

I finished up a painting of one of my grandsons while at the show:

…thanks to Joel Bock Photography for permission to use one of his photos as reference. It was fun to work on Espen’s characteristic crooked little half grin.

I’m mostly recovered / caught up / unpacked from the show…and MORE than ready to dive back into painting.

Newlyweds Portrait

SOLD via Etsy

Commission for newlyweds in Texas, acrylic on panel. 22-1/2″ x 16″; given as a gift from relatives, who had this to say about it: “This is BEAUTIFUL!!!!!!!!!!! It’s perfect!!!!!!!! My dear–they are going to LOVE this!!!!!! Amazing!!!!!!!! Thank you!! You really captured their beauty–aren’t they a stunning couple? <Name withheld> looks like a supermodel.”

Come see me Feb 22-26 @ Portland Home & Garden Show!

Yes it’s been awhile since my last post, but I’ve been getting a LOT done on the painting front! (including making frames, above)

Portland Home & Garden Show Feb 22-26 @ the Expo Center

Most importantly, I was invited by the Oregon Society of Artists to be one of their “anchor artists” at the Portland Home & Garden Show, next week: Feb 22-26! I’ve done shows for sculpture before, but this will be my debut with my “new” medium: portrait painting. I hope my banner and business cards arrive before Feb 22…and I finish making frames on time…and figure out how to light my booth…etc etc x etc.  At least paintings will be a hell of a lot easier to transport than ceramic sculpture!

I will be demonstrating painting for five days straight! I also plan to set up for doing mini photo shoots of willing passersby — head/shoulders shots for portrait painting reference. So come visit me and get your mug shot😉

The show is at the Expo Center near Jantzen Beach, Feb 22-26, 11-8 Wed Thur Fri, 10-8 Sat, 11-6 Sun, costs $10 to get in, but check around for discounts. There are three giant halls, the northernmost of which is staged with fully landscaped gardens, decks, fountains, koi ponds and so on. Around the entire perimeter of the garden room will be welders, sculptors and painters demonstrating their various crafts. I spoke with the show coordinator who has been fine tuning the ambience of this room of the show for the past dozen years. He loves art, and wants this giant indoor garden room to be one where show attendees will want to just hang out, relax, and enjoy themselves rather than scurrying to “do the show.” The OSA prez says the same thing — to just have fun like we do at the OSA center. Several OSA members will be demonstrating painting along the west wall of Building C, plus promoting the club and recruiting new members. Membership is just $30 per year.

Hope you can drop by for a chat! Bring a favorite hat/scarf/whatever for your mini photo shoot!

I’ve also been painting more portraits, including a commission from Texas, but am literally too busy to post the photos! Will do so after the show.

Okay, I’d better get back to building frames!

Rosey again, different pose

Practice portrait of Rosey by Steve Eichenberger, acrylic on corrugated cardboard bicycle carton, 9-1/4 x 13.

I enjoyed the process on this one, which is part of my goal in keeping things loose: to have fun painting!

( 1/5 addendum: I e-mailed a high resolution jpg of this to Rosey, who is currently in NYC, and she replied: “Hey Steve!! This is awesome. I look simultaneously angry and proud. I love it. The loose style captures something really great. I showed this painting to my sister, and some friends — everyone has been so impressed! My sister said, ‘Whoahhh…that’s so badass!'”)

Practice Painting

Portrait by Steve Eichenberger, acrylic on acid free paper, 14 x 17. SOLD

Another piece in my continuing effort to practice keeping things loose. I even crumpled up the paper before beginning, to make it less “precious” (which came back to haunt me after I finished the piece and decided to adhere it to a foamcore backing, but it turned out okay).

The background is pretty wild; I got a new set of palette knives and used one of them to pile on the paint.

The hair is just roughed in, but I decided it works with the background so resisted refining it.

DPW Challenge 111130

Acrylic on corrugated cardboard, 13-1/2 x 15-1/2, by Steve Eichenberger.


<—Photo I took last summer at Portland Saturday Market.

For this challenge, I tried to loosen up on brushstrokes as in this self portrait by Theodore Gericault —>

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Step by step

DPW Challenge

Portrait by Steve Eichenberger, acrylic on corrugated cardboard, 12.5 x 24.

Done in response to this week’s DPW challenge to emulate an artist we admire. This is my second exercise in as many days to experiment with the look and feel of some of Egon Schiele’s 500+ works.

Thanks to friend/neighbor/photographer Willy Paul for permission to use a photo he took of his wife, Kris, for me to use as painting reference. Achieving a likeness was not my focus, but rather to experiment with the broad white accenting strokes, black outlining, unfinished areas and so on that Schiele often uses.

DPW challenge

SOLD via Etsy

Very quick sketch in acrylics on corrugated cardboard, 12 x 16. This week’s DPW challenge was to try painting in the style of an artist we admire. I started out “thinking” Egon Schiele, but then forgot all about it much of the time I was painting… It served as a good “loosening up” exercise.

Portrait of Rosey

Painted portrait by Steve Eichenberger, acrylic on panel, 17 x 22. Click on photo above for close-up (may need to click again on the next screen to get full size).

I may continue to fine tune this painting, but I’ve been working on it for so long I wanted to post it at this near-complete stage for a sense of progress! This was a challenging project for me, I learned a lot from doing it. I took other, easier-to-paint photos of Rosey as well, but there was something about the overall composition and expression that made me want to paint this one, so I went for it. The receding angle of the hand was a challenge, as well as the wonderfully curly hair. It’s always daunting to face such things, I just have to dive in and paint *something*…and then keep revising that something to look gradually better and better until some part of me says “OK” (or sometimes “Uncle!”).

I couldn’t get rid of all the distracting reflections on the glossy background when taking the above photo with the point and shoot camera I normally use for blog shots. May have to break down and actually set up our photo room with strobes, diffusers etc. to get a better shot.

90% complete, working from photos I took of R.D. a few weeks ago in my studio.

Likeness Practice


Painted portrait by Steve Eichenberger, acrylic on panel, 17 x 26.

Thanks to .mosa for permission to use his photo (below) as reference.

Local gal

Portrait by Steve Eichenberger, acrylic on panel, 15-3/4 x 20-1/2.

Thanks to Stephen Sheffrin, Portland photographer, for permission to use his photo below as reference.

Marc Anthony acrylic portrait


Acrylic portrait of Marc Anthony by Steve Eichenberger, on 15-3/4 x 19-1/2 panel, using another photo by Damon Winter as reference (below, and previous entry).

I experimented with glazing this time: brown tinted glaze on yellow background and face (except for eyes); yellow tinted glaze on shirt.

Matt Damon practice portrait

Matt Damon practice portrait by Steve Eichenberger
acrylic on panel, 14 x 20-3/4

Reference photo from magazine cover (Fast Company, July/August 2011 issue) used by kind permission of New York Times photographer Damon Winter.

Yes, unfortunately it’s been awhile since I’ve had a chance to post anything… Travel, moving our handmade tile studio (again!), and other art related busy-ness has required all my waking hours for the past couple of months. As far as I know there are no further crises looming, but in these strange times — who knows?!? Better paint while I can.

“R” portrait

Acrylic portrait on panel by Steve Eichenberger, 11-5/8 x 14-3/8 SOLD

I completed this portrait in a homestead farmhouse in Nebraska while on a road trip through several beautiful Western states last month. When I returned home, I e-mailed the above photo of it to the subject, who is an artist friend in Seattle; here’s what he had to say about it: “OK I am really speechless, or was, but now have more to say.  That is really, really cool – almost Van Gogh-like in the colors and contrasts.  I  am thrilled to see this as I have never had a painting done of me and to tell you the truth would not trust many artists to do a painting of me as I am pretty shy about having pictures, images of me taken.  Fantastic work!  Can I show off your work to people? … I’ll be following your blog.”

I took the above reference photo in my studio with natural north light, positioning the subject to get just the right amount of light on his right eye.

Portrait Commission

Custom portrait commission, approx. 16 x 22 acrylic on panel by Steve Eichenberger.

This was fun to do because it was a surprise commission for the recipient (the subject). I hear he was honored.

The symbology has to do with his middle name, which connotes strength and deep-rootedness. A large underpainted root system (not evident in the photo) can be seen in the dark lower section when viewing the original if you know it’s there, further supporting the symbology of C’s middle name.

White Bird Gallery Show through May

Several of my ceramic sculptures, and a collection of my cast crows/ravens are in the “Animal Instincts” group show at

White Bird Gallery

Left: “Quiet Solitude Under a Canopy of Stars”; right: “Gratitude 2”; center top: a collection of my cast crows/ravens. Paintings by Anne John of Vancouver, Washington. Several other artists also submitted rabbit themed art for this “Animal Instincts” show…unplanned.

The show runs through May 31.

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April 29, 30 & May 1 it was Spring Unveiling Weekend for the Cannon Beach Gallery Group, and they featured one of my sculptures, “Gratitude 3” (which is in the White Bird Gallery show, in the front window), on the cover of their brochure:

The “unveiling” of the new show at White Bird Gallery was at 3 p.m. Saturday, April 30. There were scheduled unveilings at over a dozen venues throughout Cannon Beach, visit CBGalleryGroup.com for details (scroll all the way down for White Bird’s announcement).

Custom Portrait Commission




Local Portrait Commission

by Steve Eichenberger

Acrylic on panel

16 x 22


He’s about a year older now than when the photo was taken.

Reference photo provided by client.

(Thanks C. for your OK to post this on my blog.)

Pet Portrait

Acrylic painting on panel, by Steve Eichenberger

“First Day at the Dog Park” SOLD

approx 13 x 26

(keep clicking on photo for close-up)

Based on a photo I took the other day at Luscher Farms dog park in Lake Oswego. He looks like a little bear.

Positive Step!

Started this one yesterday, finished tonight…well, I might still work on the background, but I think the face is done. And I am pleased with the step toward looseness it represents in my experimentation!

I had a color experiment in mind too; I saw in a color mixing book the wonderful neutral greens that result from mixing ultramarine blue and yellow ochre, so started with them. I don’t usually like or use greens, so this was a good learning experience for me in that regard too.

In the slideshow below, the first one (the one that’s different from all the rest) is actually a completely different painting. I was struggling to get a likeness, painting out and re-painting various features, when I realized I wasn’t having fun. So I set it aside and started over using bolder color, less deliberation, and choppier strokes with almost no blending. Definitely more fun! Adjusting position/size etc of features was much easier as the entire image was freer, looser, more fluid.

It’s hard to quantify how well I did on the likeness…but for such an impressionistic rendition I’m OK with it.

I don’t like the background, may work on it some more later…or not…also want to keep moving forward to see what comes out next!

I scrounged some bicycle cartons today from a bike shop near my studio, so I have plenty of “canvasses” to work on. I’m motivated to make as many paintings as I can before April 1 when I open my studio for First Friday Artwalk. I don’t expect a big crowd, but it’s a nice motivation nonetheless.

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My thanks to Bill Wadman at http://www.365portraits.com/ for permission to use his photo as practice reference.

Keep clicking through several screens on the above image to zoom in close to see the brush strokes (the final click should show a magnifying glass cursor).

Big & Small

This was a challenge for me because of its size — about 3 feet wide. I wasn’t attempting a likeness, just trying to get proportions reasonably in the ballpark since I was working far larger than I’ve ever done before.

This one taught me I don’t like working small! Face is only about 2-1/2″ tall. I used teeny tiny brushes. Not that happy with the likeness either, although for having just recently started trying to do likenesses I guess I shouldn’t be too hard on myself.

My thanks to Bill Wadman at http://www.365portraits.com/ for permission to use his photo as practice reference.

Lyle Lovett

Acrylic painting of Lyle Lovett by Steve Eichenberger (click on image for close-up view)

Painted freehand looking at various photos from the web (below).

Thank you to Lyle’s management office for giving me the go-ahead to paint his likeness.

on 8×13 corrugated cardboard

It helped to have various angles and lighting to discern shapes and decide what characteristics seemed most important for a likeness.

I did a preliminary study which took longer than this one, but I don’t like it as well as this one so I’m not posting it. But it did teach me that doing a study first is beneficial; I basically had the features memorized, including what to “watch out for” the second time around.

Portrait Practice


Lifesize portrait, acrylic on 34 x 42 cardboard, freehand from photo reference.

Photo credit: Bill Wadman, 365portraits.com. Used by permission.

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First two slides: Practicing achieving a likeness. Not sure my “corrections” are better…maybe overcorrected. Will try again tomorrow, maybe split the difference.

My thanks to Bill Wadman at http://www.365portraits.com/ for permission to use his photo as practice reference.

3/6 update: I’m painting entirely freehand, just looking at the photo for reference…no enlarging, no grids. But I was curious which iteration I’ve done so far was more accurate, so I put everything in the computer and did some overlays. My conclusion is that I did indeed overcorrect. I’ll keep tweaking today. I think some good learning is going on.

3/6 evening: I did paint out and re-do a third time, splitting the difference, and I think it helped. May add a few final highlights and/or dark accents tomorrow. It’s my largest painting so far; lifesize figure on a 34 w x 42 h piece of corrugated cardboard that was throwing around the Watershed.

Literature about portraiture says a typical newbie mistake is to make all the features too large. In comparing my painting to the original photo I think I was too careful on this count; I made the features too small rather than too large, which in my opinion makes the subject look more mature. To me, iterations 1 and 2 look the right age for the subject, but they look perkier, more open than she does in the photo, as pointed out by a friend who came in my studio during iteration 2. I think I captured her more inward, slightly guarded expression in iteration 3, but in so doing aged her a few years vs iterations 1 and 2. Interesting how such seemingly minor adjustments have unforeseen effects…effects I can use on purpose in the future. (3/7 addendum: an artist friend had the opposite opinion about apparent age: he thought my portrait looked younger than the subject. Jackie thought the painting and photo look the same age. My first lessons in how subjective evaluating my work will be…)

One thing I liked right away about this subject is her sweeping jawline and the way it presents in the pose; my extra attention to this feature resulted in a bit of an exaggeration of that sweep, which I’ll chalk up to artist’s license.

More practicing on cardboard

To test myself to see if I could produce a likeness. 1 hour sketch.

Unfinished. Can’t decide what to put under his head. Someone suggested making him a dandelion’s head😉

Very fast sketch.

Quick sketch.

Quick sketch in box. My intention was to do the eye sockets in complete shadow, but I see from the photo I didn’t resist putting in some detail.

Painting on Cardboard

When I first wondered about painting on cardboard myself, I of course googled it…and now Google is sending some of you to *this* entry for info on ‘painting on cardboard.’ So here’s what I’ve learned from my experience with cardboard so far:

Artists have been painting on cardboard for over 100 years (e.g. this Picasso, 1900).

Cardboard’s main advantages in my opinion:

— It is non-precious. I find I paint more freely on corrugated cardboard than any other substrate. Even before I make the first brushstroke I feel like “this is an experiment.”

— It’s free! It’s abundant!

— I can work on an oversize piece of cardboard, and “crop” my painting with a knife after the fact.

— It’s already manufactured. I’m repurposing something that would otherwise be recycled or discarded. Zero carbon footprint.

— It’s immediate. Cut, paint.

— I like the way it takes paint. (I use heavy body, artist’s grade acrylics.)

— It’s fun to see what graphics may already be printed on it (see this painting for example) that I can leave visible.

— It’s lightweight.

— If it gets beat up a little on the edges or corners, who cares?!?

The best cardboard for painting is double thick; two corrugated layers sandwiched together. To find the best stuff, think of large/fragile/expensive items, and go to stores that sell them — electronics, bicycles, appliances. I’ve found that local bike shops are happy to save me their bicycle cartons.

Take a box cutter along to cut down the cartons for easier transport (as a courtesy I also haul away the leftover scraps and recycle them myself, so I don’t leave a mess for the shop owner).

Large Home Depot-type stores tend to bale their cardboard immediately, unfortunately, although I did score a refrigerator box at Lowes by being there at precisely the right time once.

Keep your cardboard stash dry, don’t store in a shed or humid environment. Avoid cheap pulpy cardboard (such as cartons for tools from Harbor Freight ).

For relatively temporary works (years, not decades) just paint right on the cardboard. It will be absorbent, which can be annoying or useful depending on your medium and intentions. Bare areas will be subject to fading, especially if displayed where sunlight strikes it.

To make it much less absorbent but still retain its cardboardy look, apply thinned down acrylic medium before painting on it; do both sides equally to minimize warping.

For more permanence, prime both sides with house primer, gesso, or acrylic medium. Give both sides an equal number of coats to minimize warping.

For grunge appeal, you can purposely tear off the top layer here and there to expose underlying corrugations, and/or leave some of the arrows, ‘this side up’ labeling, hand hold holes, big copper staples, UPC codes, and other original artifacts intact or partially painted over.

Tip for hanging  cardboard paintings: 

Easy hanging method: glue scrap on back, insert picture wire down through one corrugation and back up through another, twist wires.

Cut scrap of cardboard and glue onto back of painting as anchor for a hanging wire or string. It’s surprisingly strong, and is in keeping with the cardboard theme. You can also make hang tags, title placards, portfolios to transport your cardboard masterpieces in, and so on, all from cardboard. Once you have large sheets of it laying around, all kinds of uses start popping up.

You can “reverse engineer” how to make a cardboard box by looking at an already-made one, draw a layout on a big panel, cut/score it, paint it, then fold/glue/staple it into a sturdy decorated box that will last for years with reasonable care.

I painted the self portrait (below) on cardboard, as well as the following paintings:

https://steveeichenberger.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/positive-step/

https://steveeichenberger.wordpress.com/2011/03/23/big-small/

https://steveeichenberger.wordpress.com/2011/03/13/lyle-lovett/

https://steveeichenberger.wordpress.com/2011/03/05/portrait-practice/

https://steveeichenberger.wordpress.com/2011/03/05/more-practicing-on-cardboard/

That’s it for now…I’ll add more if I think of something else.

Good luck!

.

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Following is my original entry under the heading “Painting on Cardboard” :

Self Portrait February 24 2011, freehand from a b/w photo I took yesterday

Acrylic on corrugated cardboard, slightly smaller than life size (area shown is 13 x 15, panel is 19 x 27)

Using just two colors of paint: Burnt Sienna and Unbleached Titanium White

We had a “snow day” today, many Portlanders stayed home from work. This painting is what I did with my snow day. No my hair doesn’t have snow on it, that’s just the color it has decided to be now that it’s grown up.

I enjoyed the process.

The product, however, is way more conservative than I’d like…it’s a baby step along the path of moving stylistically to where I’d rather be.

This is the  most recent practice project in my current fling with attempting likenesses. I think the painting probably looks better than the subject, but since it’s a self portrait I’m not keen on posting the reference photo just to prove the subject looks worse than the painting.

Patina Crisis Resolved

“Exploring Happiness” series, “Orangutan” by Steve Eichenberger

20″h x 15″w x 7″d

Fired ceramic, rubbed pigment and wax patina, wall mount.

I’ve been working on publicity for our Valentines season double weekend show in our new Venetian Red Gallery space, so haven’t had much time to sculpt recently, but I did accomplish something, something I’ve been stressing over for months — figuring out how to patina my new series. I experimented on a couple of small test heads, then got up my nerve and patinaed the above pictured “Orangutan.”

Feb 22 addendum: Now I’m painting. Yes, painting…painting faces, on cardboard. Um hm, I did say cardboard. As in corrugated. Because I just wanted something to quickly experiment on, and there was a nice box at hand.  And now I kind of like the mid-tone ground, the absorbency, the repurposing. Not sure if I’ll post photos (which would only serve to document my current state of digression from whatever trajectory I was on before).

After watching myself from afar…well, not that far…for many decades, I’ve noticed some patterns within my disorganization. My current position in the creative cycle I call “scrabbling.” Like what you would do if you were stuck in a mud bog…try to scrabble your way forward. Or what you would do to the side walls of a pit you’re stuck in: try to scrabble your way out. Scrabbling is unsettling because there’s no way of knowing if all the frenetic energy expended will ever move me in any beneficial direction, or just exhaust me. But I also have an underlying current of enigmatic expectation, that anything can happen. My critic grumbles nothing probably will, but my 17-year-old core-self says Some Big Thing Just Might.

I experience the full gamut of emotions simultaneously during scrabbling, resulting in an over-cooked internal stew that tastes kind of gray, but nevertheless provides abundant energy to keep on scrabbling. And I do feel highly motivated to keep on scrabbling, no matter what, no matter if there’s no known why (yet). The afar part of me is entertained watching myself scrabble. I’m curious to see where it will take me this time — where it will lead me artistically.

Untitled

Untitled, ceramic sculpture by Steve Eichenberger

SOLD

A little smaller than life size. Sculpted solid, hollowed out, pieces cut out and glazed separately, then black grouted back together. It doesn’t translate in the photo, but the mid-toned portions have exquisite patterns of shiny black nubbins smaller than the head of a pin; visually and tactilely mesmerizing. The lightest section looks and feels like ivory — not white — but it’s virtually impossible to photograph pieces with extreme lights and darks without over- or under-exposing one or the other.

I think this piece has something to do with the ever-present background/subconscious weighing of issues that have no clear answers.

Looks kinda like…

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And it appears I’m off on yet another side trip…indulging a recurring fascination with trying to do likenesses of people. I check in every ten or twenty years to see if I can do it yet. No clear idea of why, or what I’ll do with the results if I do…but it seems like a good skill to have in my toolbox.